European Space Agency YouTube Update

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14-08-2018 07:16 PM CEST

Diego Fernandez and Chris Stewart welcome Earth observation attendants and provide their opening remarks.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

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For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 06:29 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Leif Toudal, during the session titled ‚Remote sensing of sea ice‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 06:29 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Martin Viesbeck from the Physical Oceanography at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany, during the session titled ‚Opportunities for integrated ocean observing‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 06:29 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Anny Cazenave from the Laboratoire d’Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiales’, Toulouse, France, during the session titled ‚Earth system, past and present‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 06:29 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Anny Cazenave from the Laboratoire d’Etudes en Géophysique et Océanographie Spatiales’, Toulouse, France, during the session titled ‚Sea-level rise from space‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 06:29 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Martin Viesbeck from the Physical Oceanography at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany, during the session titled ‚Environmental science and sustainable development‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 04:12 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Andrew Shepherd, during the session titled ‚How to measure 3 trillion tons of ice‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 03:27 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Zoltan Veckerdy, during the session titled ‚Monitoring the water cycle over land: water bodies and soil moisture‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 03:18 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Zoltan Veckerdy, during the session titled ‚Monitoring the water cycle over land: rainfall and surface energy balance‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 03:18 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Bertrand Chapron, during the session titled ‚Satellite oceanography: an integrated perspective‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 03:18 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Marie-Hélène Rio, during the session titled ‚Ocean Circulation: Introduction‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 03:18 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Bob Brewin, during the session titled ‚Ocean colour theory‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 03:18 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Leif Toudal, during the session titled ‚Remote sensing and modelling of sea ice‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 03:18 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Bertrand Chapron, during the session titled ‚Satellite oceanography: an integrated perspective‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool


14-08-2018 03:17 PM CEST

This presentation was given by Marie-Hélène Rio, during the session titled ‚Ocean circulation: Space and in-situ data synergy‘.

Every two years, ESA’s Earth observation summer schools draws young scientists from all over the world to learn more about remote sensing, Earth system science, modelling and monitoring, and how data can be used to better understand the world we live in. In 2018, the two-week summer school is held on 30 July to 10 August. While the students engage in practical sessions in the afternoons, the morning lectures were streamed live.

★ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ESAsubscribe

For more information visit: http://bit.ly/EOsummerSchool

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European Space Agency Flickr Update

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Farther, together
14-08-2018 05:14 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Farther, together

This image of three miniature satellites or CubeSats freshly launched into space is a striking reminder of human cooperation at the heart of space exploration.

Bhutan’s first ever satellite along with others from Malaysia and the Philippines were released into their respective orbits from the International Space Station on 10 August.

While the launch was a first for Bhutan, it was just another day on the International Space Station that was built and is maintained by thousands of people across the globe.

Launched in 1998, the Space Station is the culmination of years of international planning and partnership between the United States, Canada, Japan, Russia, and participating European countries.

In its 20 years of operation it has hosted many international flight crews, launched global operations and conducted research from the world-wide scientific community.

It is not only a technological achievement but a successful testament to partnership across borders.

ESA is continuing along these lines of partnership and cooperation in its new European vision for space exploration.

In addition to committing its support for the Space Station, the agency is partnering with the commercial sector to make the Space Station more accessible to all with programmes such as the International Commercial Experiments Service, or ICE Cubes.

The agency is also setting its sights beyond low-Earth orbit, with ambitious plans for the Moon, a deep space gateway and a Mars landing.

For the Moon, ESA is preparing for a robotic landing in partnership with Russia as early as 2022. The mission will look for water ice.

Returning humans to the Moon is underway in collaboration with NASA on the Orion vehicle, with a European service module at its core, that will build bridges to Moon and Mars by sending humans further into space than ever before.

Like the International Space Station, this new age of exploration will be achieved not in competition, but through international cooperation.

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst put it best when posted this image on social media, writing “If you want to go far, go together.”

We’re already on it.

Credits: ESA/NASA-A. Gerst

European Space Agency Flickr Update

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Partial solar eclipse from space
13-08-2018 04:38 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Partial solar eclipse from space

Thanks to a quirk of our cosmos, the Moon’s average distance from Earth is just right for it to appear as the same size in the sky as the significantly larger Sun. Once in a while the Moon slides directly between Earth and the Sun such that it appears to cover our star completely, temporarily blocking out its light and creating a total solar eclipse for those along the narrow path cast by the Moon’s shadow.

But sometimes the alignment is such that the Moon only partially covers the Sun’s disc. Such a partial eclipse occurred on Saturday for observers located primarily in northern and eastern Europe, northern parts of North America, and some northern locations in Asia.

ESA’s Sun-watching Proba-2 satellite orbits Earth about 14.5 times per day and with its constant change in viewing angle, it dipped in and out of the Moon’s shadow twice during Saturday’s eclipse.

Selected views of the two partial eclipses are seen side-by-side here – the first (left) was captured at 08:40:12 GMT and the second (right) at 10:32:17 GMT on 11 August.

The images were taken by the satellite’s SWAP camera, which works at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths to capture the Sun’s hot turbulent atmosphere – the corona – at temperatures of about a million degrees, which can be seen in the background.

Credits: ESA/Royal Observatory of Belgium

European Space Agency YouTube Update

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13-08-2018 07:37 PM CEST

Ever wondered what it feels like to fly from Alaska to the Andes in 260 seconds? ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst captured this timelapse footage of Alaska, the USA and South America while orbiting Earth on board the International Space Station.

This timelapse is made up of 6,375 images shown 12.5 times faster than actual speed. Music is Our Oasis by Miriam Speyer, sourced from Audio Network Limited.

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Follow Alexander and the Horizons mission on social media via http://bit.ly/AlexanderGerstESA and on http://bit.ly/HorizonsBlogESA.

European Space Agency Flickr Update

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Aeolus on a roll
10-08-2018 03:21 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Aeolus on a roll

After being sealed within its Vega rocket fairing, Aeolus has been rolled out to the launch pad at Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. Here it will join the rest of the rocket in the launch tower in preparation for liftoff on 21 August at 21:20 GMT (23:20 CEST).

Credits: ESA

A globular cluster’s striking red eye
10-08-2018 01:31 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

A globular cluster’s striking red eye

This Picture of the Week shows the colourful globular cluster NGC 2108. The cluster is nestled within the Large Magellanic Cloud, in the constellation of the Swordfish (Dorado). It was discovered in 1835 by the astronomer, mathematician, chemist and inventor John Herschel, son of the famous William Herschel.

The most striking feature of this globular cluster is the gleaming ruby-red spot at the centre left of the image. What looks like the cluster’s watchful eye is actually a carbon star. Carbon stars are almost always cool red giants, with atmospheres containing more carbon than oxygen — the opposite to our Sun. Carbon monoxide forms in the outer layer of the star through a combination of these elements, until there is no more oxygen available. Carbon atoms are then free to form a variety of other carbon compounds, such as C2, CH, CN, C3 and SiC2, which scatter blue light within the star, allowing red light to pass through undisturbed.

This image was captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), using three different filters.

Credits: ESA/Hubble & NASA, CC BY 4.0