European Space Agency Flickr Update

Standard

The real thing
24-08-2016 02:02 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

The real thing

The European Service Module that will power NASA’s Orion spacecraft to the Moon and beyond is taking shape in the assembly hall at Airbus Defence and Space, Bremen, Germany. The spacecraft module will provide propulsion, electricity, water, oxygen and nitrogen and thermal control.

Seen here is the primary structure that provides rigidity to the European Service Module much like the chassis of a car. It absorbs the vibrations and energy from launch while a secondary structure protects the module from micrometeoroids and space debris.

Assembly of the thousands of components needed to build the advanced spacecraft started on 19 May with the arrival of the primary structure that was shipped from Turin, Italy, by Thales Alenia Space. In 2018 this structure will be an element of the European Service Module that will be launched into space, as part of the Orion spacecraft, on its first mission to fly more than 64 000 km beyond the Moon and back.

In the background is a poster of ESA’s Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) that was also assembled in this hall in Bremen. Five ATVs flew to the International Space Station to deliver supplies and raise its orbit. Developing ATV provided the experience necessary to develop the European Service Module in Europe.

Credit: Airbus DS

You are subscribed to Flickr for European Space Agency.

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

European Space Agency YouTube Update

Standard


23-08-2016 07:05 PM CEST


23-08-2016 06:59 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:12 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:11 PM CEST


23-08-2016 01:11 PM CEST

You are subscribed to YouTube for European Space Agency.

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

European Space Agency Flickr Update

Standard

Planck’s flame-filled view of the Polaris Flare
22-08-2016 01:53 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Planck's flame-filled view of the Polaris Flare

This image from ESA’s Planck satellite appears to show something quite ethereal and fantastical: a sprite-like figure emerging from scorching flames and walking towards the left of the frame, its silhouette a blaze of warm-hued colours.

This fiery illusion is actually a celestial feature named the Polaris Flare. This name is somewhat misleading; despite its moniker, the Polaris Flare is not a flare but a 10 light-year-wide bundle of dusty filaments in the constellation of Ursa Minor (The Little Bear), some 500 light-years away.

The Polaris Flare is located near the North Celestial Pole, a perceived point in the sky aligned with Earth’s spin axis. Extended into the skies of the northern and southern hemispheres, this imaginary line points to the two celestial poles. To find the North Celestial Pole, an observer need only locate the nearby Polaris (otherwise known as the North Star or Pole Star), the brightest star in the constellation of Ursa Minor.

Some of the secrets of the Polaris Flare were uncovered when it was observed by ESA’s Herschel some years ago. Using a combination of such Herschel observations and a computer simulation, scientists think that the Polaris Flare filaments could have been formed as a result of slow shockwaves pushing their way through a dense interstellar cloud, an accumulation of cold cosmic dust and gas sitting between the stars of our Galaxy.

These shockwaves, reminiscent of the sonic booms formed by fast sound waves here on Earth, would have been themselves triggered by nearby exploding stars that disrupted their surroundings as they died, triggering cloud-wide waves of turbulence

These shockwaves, reminiscent of the sonic booms formed by fast sound waves here on Earth, were themselves triggered by nearby exploding stars that disrupted their surroundings as they died, triggering cloud-wide waves of turbulence. These waves swept up the gas and dust in their path, sculpting the material into the snaking filaments we see.

This image is not a true-colour view, nor is it an artistic impression of the Flare, rather it comprises observations from Planck, which operated between 2009 and 2013. Planck scanned and mapped the entire sky, including the plane of the Milky Way, looking for signs of ancient light (known as the cosmic microwave background) and cosmic dust emission. This dust emission allowed Planck to create this unique map of the sky – a magnetic map.

The relief lines laced across this image show the average direction of our Galaxy’s magnetic field in the region containing the Polaris Flare. This was created using the observed emission from cosmic dust, which was polarised (constrained to one direction). Dust grains in and around the Milky Way are affected by and interlaced with the Galaxy’s magnetic field, causing them to align preferentially in space. This carries through to the dust’s emission, which also displays a preferential orientation that Planck could detect.

The emission from dust is computed from a combination of Planck observations at 353, 545 and 857 GHz, whereas the direction of the magnetic field is based on Planck polarisation data at 353 GHz. This frame has an area of 30 x 30º on the sky, and the colours represent the intensity of dust emission.

Credit: ESA and the Planck Collaboration

An irregular island
22-08-2016 10:44 AM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

An irregular island

This image, courtesy of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), captures the glow of distant stars within NGC 5264, a dwarf galaxy located just over 15 million light-years away in the constellation of Hydra (The Sea Serpent).

Dwarf galaxies like NGC 5264 typically possess around a billion stars — just one per cent of the number of stars found within the Milky Way. They are usually found orbiting other, larger, galaxies such as our own, and are thought to form from the material left over from the messy formation of their larger cosmic relatives.

NGC 5264 clearly possesses an irregular shape — unlike the more common spiral or elliptical galaxies — with knots of blue star formation. Astronomers believe that this is due to the gravitational interactions between NGC 5264 and other galaxies nearby. These past flirtations sparked the formation of new generations of stars, which now glow in bright shades of blue.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

You are subscribed to Flickr for European Space Agency.

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

European Space Agency Flickr Update

Standard

The longest call
18-08-2016 05:05 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

The longest call

Operations image of the week:

On 10 August 2016, ESA’s tracking station at New Norcia, Western Australia, hosting a 35 m-diameter, 630-tonne deep-space antenna, received signals transmitted by NASA’s Cassini orbiter at Saturn, through 1.44 billion km of space.

“This was the farthest-ever reception for an ESA station, and the radio signals – travelling at the speed of light – took 80 minutes to cover this vast distance,” says Daniel Firre, responsible for supporting Cassini radio science at ESOC, ESA’s operations centre in Darmstadt, Germany.

The signal reception was part of a series of tests to prepare several ESA stations to support Cassini’s radio science investigations, planned to begin later in 2016.

This image shows New Norcia station as seen in 2014 by Dylan O’Donnell, an amateur photographer based in Byron Bay, Australia (the blob of light apparently hovering above the antenna is a light artefact, ‘lens flare’).

Credit: ESA/D. O’Donnell

You are subscribed to Flickr for European Space Agency.

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

Raumfahrtexperten beim Flugtag des Aero-Club in Bad Nauheim

Standard

Raumfahrtexperten beim Flugtag des Aero-Club in Bad Nauheim
18-08-2016 07:06 PM CEST

Flugtag_Bad_Nauheim_small.jpg

Experten und begeisterte Privatflieger der ESA aus Darmstadt präsentieren am 27. und 28. August beim Flugtag des Aero-Clubs in Bad Nauheim (Mittelhessen). Die Öffentlichkeit und die Medien sind herzlich zur Teilnahme eingeladen.

You are subscribed to Germany (DE) for European Space Agency.

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.