News Release: EPA Awards Student Fellowships in 25 States and Puer to Rico to Support the Next Generation of Environmental Scientists

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CONTACT:
Cathy Milbourn
milbourn.cathy@epa.gov

202-564-7849
202-564-4355

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 31, 2015

EPA Awards Student Fellowships in 25 States and Puerto Rico to Support the Next Generation of Environmental Scientists

Washington, DC –Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced 34 fellowships for undergraduate students in 25 states and Puerto Rico to pursue environmental science and related fields of study at universities and colleges across the nation, helping to inspire the next generation of environmental scientists and engineers. The awards, part of EPA’s Greater Research Opportunities (GRO) fellowship program, provide students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience with agency scientists.

“These students’ ambitious and innovative ideas will help create a more sustainable future,” said Lek Kadeli, Acting Assistant Administrator for EPA’s Office of Research and Development. “EPA is investing in the next generation of environmental scientists and engineers whose research will help achieve our mission of protecting human health and the environment.”

Previous fellows have been recognized as leaders and educators in environmental health and science. More than 362 fellows have completed EPA’s program and have employed their knowledge and expertise in the workplace. Examples include:

• Evan Bredeweg, a 2006 GRO Fellow, elaborated on his time in the program saying, “The GRO fellowship has definitely helped me pursue my goals. It provided a starting block for me to begin my academic career and helped open doors to further opportunities.”

• Sacoby Wilson, a 1996 GRO fellow, is now an assistant professor with the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH) and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Maryland-College Park;

• Cynthia Williams, a 2000 GRO fellow, is a systems engineer at the Missile Defense Agency.

The students selected for fellowships are undergraduates entering their junior year. The fellowship provides up to $20,700 a year of academic support that includes both stipend and tuition support as well as $8,600 for an internship during the summer for a combined total of up to $50,000 over the life of the fellowship.

For more than 30 years, EPA’s GRO Fellowship has been providing students in environmental science related fields the tools to succeed not only in their undergraduate studies and internship, but also in their future careers. The GRO program gives institutions the opportunity to grow and create a culture of excellence through their students.

The 2014 fellowships have been awarded to students at the following universities:

• University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Ala.
• Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Ariz.
• University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark.
• Claremont Mckenna College, Claremont, Calif.
• University of San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif.
• University of Denver, Denver, Colo.
• University of New Haven, West Haven, Conn.
• Delaware State University, Dover, Del.
• Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga.
• University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, Hawaii
• Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Ill.
• Buena Vista University, Storm Lake, Iowa
• Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, La.
• Smith College, Northampton, Mass.
• Stonehill College, North Easton, Mass.
• Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass.
• Salisbury University, Salisbury, Md.
• Lake Superior State University, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.
• Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Mich.
• Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, N.C.
• University of New Hampshire, Durham, N.H.
• City College of New York, New York, N.Y.
• Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio
• Portland State University, Portland, Ore.
• Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa.
• Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pa.
• University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico
• Dakota State University, Madison, S.D.
• Baylor University, Waco, Texas
• University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
• Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Va.
• University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, Eau Claire, Wis.
• University of Wisconsin – Green Bay, Green Bay, Wis.

The solicitation for the next round of GRO fellowships is now open for applications.

For more information on the awarded GRO Fellows: http://epa.gov/ncer/14GROfellows
For more information about applying for the next round of GRO fellowships: http://epa.gov/ncer/rfa/2015/2015_gro_undergrad.html
For information about the GRO Fellowship Program: http://epa.gov/ncer/fellow/
For more information on fellowships at EPA: http://epa.gov/ncer/fellow/gro-faq.pdf

News Release:

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March 31, 2015

Hi, you’re getting this message because you’re subscribed to receive email from EPA.

You may have already read in a previous email, tomorrow is the big day! We’re making a few changes to improve how we send email and how you subscribe or change your email subscription settings. Therefore, we’re sending you this message today for two reasons:

First, to indicate we’re changing tomorrow.

Second, to let you know that also tomorrow, April 1, we’ll send out a general test message. The purpose of the April 1 test message is to help you to make any changes to your email account’s inbox spam or junk email filters, if you use spam filters. If you receive the message tomorrow as you have been receiving EPA emails from you, you’re all set.

But if you DON’T receive our initial test message tomorrow, please remember to check your spam or junk email filters. Contact your email provider if you need help in adjusting your email filters to allow our emails to come through.

What’s different?

Our Public Affairs Office is moving to a new system that will help us better serve your needs. Some, but not all, of the lists EPA manages will move to the new system. Now you’ll have the option to provide demographic or interest info that will help us better tailor messages to your interests for these lists.

Why are we making changes?

In the new system you’ll have the opportunity to change or add your topics of interest.

One important change is that we want to better serve folks in emergency situations. For example, if you lived along the coast and a storm washed ashore, we’d be able to communicate better about where you can get fresh water, or perhaps drop off hazardous waste after flooding. We learned during previous storms that people relied on local information, specific to their needs.

When is it happening?

After today, the email system we use to send emails to you will be different. You may notice some changes in the look of the sign-up form or the emails. But, now you’ll have a place where you can manage any information you choose to share; all in a password protected page.

Great! How do I sign up?

Since you’re already a subscriber, you don’t HAVE to do anything. But if you want to add geographic information or edit your preferences, go to page http://www2.epa.gov/newsroom/email-subscriptions and put in your email address. Then you’ll be taken your profile page where you’ll create a password and can choose what you’d like to receive and any other info you’d like to share. All the topics related to this email subscription change are listed.

After you’re done we’ll send a quick validation email. That’s it!

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Office of Public Affairs
US Environmental Protection Agency

European Space Agency Flickr Update

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Landslide_risk_monitoring_with_Sentinel-1[1]
31-03-2015 04:16 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Landslide_risk_monitoring_with_Sentinel-1[1]

Sentinel-1A radar scans from 23 September and 30 August 2014 were combined to create this ‘interferometric’ image showing surface deformation of a landslide in the municipality of Kåfjord in Troms county, Norway. In the 24 days between the two acquisitions, the ground moved about 1 cm.

Synthetic aperture radar interferometry – or InSAR – is an important technique used by the Norwegian authorities to map rockslide hazards nationwide. The unprecedented coverage offered by the Sentinel-1 mission will significantly increase the value of InSAR data for this purpose. The satellite passes over the same spot on the ground every 12 days.

This image is from a selection of results from 2015 Fringe Workshop on advances in the science and applications of ‘SAR interferometry’. The 2015 Fringe Workshop was held at ESRIN, ESA’s centre for Earth observation, in Frascati, Italy on 23–27 March.

Credit: Copernicus data (2014)/ESA/Norut–SEOM Insarap study

Iraq and Eastern Turkey
31-03-2015 03:48 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Iraq and Eastern Turkey

This image combines two scans from Sentinel-1A’s radar on 3 and 15 October 2014 over Iraq and Eastern Turkey. Colours come from the combined coherence and intensity information and show a wealth of information on the landscape. Assigning certain colours to certain features on the ground requires a more detailed analysis.

This image is from a selection of results from 2015 Fringe Workshop on advances in the science and applications of ‘SAR interferometry’. The 2015 Fringe Workshop was held at ESRIN, ESA’s centre for Earth observation, in Frascati, Italy on 23–27 March.

Credit: Copernicus data (2014)/ESA/PPO.labs/Norut by SEOM InSARap

Tomographic Berlin
31-03-2015 03:48 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Tomographic Berlin

This image was created using the remote sensing technique ‘SAR tomography’ with radar data from the German TerraSAR-X mission acquired between 2009 and 2013. Different coloured points represent different heights.

The point density reaches 1 million points per sq km. Behind each point, the linear deformation rate and the amplitude of thermal expansion from warm weather can also be estimated with millimetre-precision.

This image is from a selection of results from 2015 Fringe Workshop on advances in the science and applications of ‘SAR interferometry’. The 2015 Fringe Workshop was held at ESRIN, ESA’s centre for Earth observation, in Frascati, Italy on 23–27 March.

This result was processed using DLR’s Tomographic SAR Processing System, Tomo-GENESIS.

Credit: DLR-IMF/TUM-LMF

Greenland ice streams
31-03-2015 03:48 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Greenland ice streams

This image combines two Sentinel-1A radar scans from 3 and 15 January 2015 to show ice velocities on outlet glaciers of Greenland’s west coast. Sentinel-1 offers excellent capabilities for observing the velocities of Greenland’s outlet glaciers with unprecedented temporal resolution at complete spatial coverage, extending and enhancing the time series of ice-velocity maps available from previous satellite sensors.

This image is from a selection of results from 2015 Fringe Workshop on advances in the science and applications of ‘SAR interferometry’. The 2015 Fringe Workshop was held at ESRIN, ESA’s centre for Earth observation, in Frascati, Italy on 23–27 March.

Credit: Copernicus data (2015)/ESA/Enveo

Sentinel-1A interferogram, San Joaquin Valley
31-03-2015 03:48 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Sentinel-1A interferogram, San Joaquin Valley

This ‘interferogram’ combines 19 scans by Sentinel-1A’s radar over the San Joaquin Valley in the US state of California. Covering an area of about 30 000 sq km, a number of oil fields are visible (outlined in black). Surface patterns of motion, such as subsidence (red) and uplift (blue), associated with ‘enhanced oil recovery’ operations are observable in the image.

The remote sensing technique known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, or InSAR, can be used for a variety of operational applications, including the monitoring of well integrity, reservoir optimisation, identification of undrained compartments and the management of injection activities.

This image is from a selection of results from 2015 Fringe Workshop on advances in the science and applications of ‘SAR interferometry’. The 2015 Fringe Workshop was held at ESRIN, ESA’s centre for Earth observation, in Frascati, Italy on 23–27 March.

This image was processed by Tele-Rilevamento Europa, which provides measurements of surface deformation with millimetre accuracy using multitemporal satellite radar images. The company has been recognised for its work in the oil and gas sector.

Credit: Tele-Rilevamento Europa

President of the Italian Republic Sergio Mattarella visits ESA Headquarters
31-03-2015 09:26 AM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

President of the Italian Republic Sergio Mattarella visits ESA Headquarters

On the occasion of an official visit to France, the President of the Italian Republic Sergio Mattarella honoured ESA with a visit to ESA Headquarters on Monday 30 March 2015.

The President and the Italian Undersecretary of State Mario Giro were welcomed to ESA by Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain together with ESA Director of Planning, Policy and Control Giuseppe Morsillo and ESA Director of Technical and Quality Management Franco Ongaro.

Upon arrival, the President’s Delegation shook hands with Italian ESA staff. Following a meeting with the ESA DG, the Delegation was treated to a 20-minute call with ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti onboard the International Space Station.

President of the Italian Republic Sergio Mattarella visits ESA Headquarters
31-03-2015 09:26 AM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

President of the Italian Republic Sergio Mattarella visits ESA Headquarters

On the occasion of an official visit to France, the President of the Italian Republic Sergio Mattarella honoured ESA with a visit to ESA Headquarters on Monday 30 March 2015.

The President and the Italian Undersecretary of State Mario Giro were welcomed to ESA by Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain together with ESA Director of Planning, Policy and Control Giuseppe Morsillo and ESA Director of Technical and Quality Management Franco Ongaro.

Upon arrival, the President’s Delegation shook hands with Italian ESA staff. Following a meeting with the ESA DG, the Delegation was treated to a 20-minute call with ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti onboard the International Space Station.

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European Space Agency YouTube Update

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31-03-2015 07:36 PM CEST

We could call them the good, the bad and the ugly! No, we are not talking of spaghetti westerns… Instead, we are talking about a type of fat called lipids. Often we speak badly about them, but some are essential to our health as they reduce chronic inflammation, help lower ‘bad’ cholesterol – LDL – and are a valuable aid in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

We asked Samantha Cristoforetti, ESA astronaut on board of the International Space Station for the Futura mission, to tell us about which king of healthy fats she and the other astronauts can enjoy while on orbit.

From: European Space Agency, ESA
Views: 301

82 ratings
Time: 01:51 More in Science & Technology


31-03-2015 07:31 PM CEST

Potremmo chiamarli il buono, il brutto e il cattivo! No, non stiamo parlando di spaghetti-western ma di lipidi. Spesso se ne parla male ma alcuni tipi di grassi sono essenziali per la nostra salute, sulla Terra come anche a bordo della Stazione Spaziale Internazionale. Abbiamo chiesto a Samantha Cristoforetti, astronauta ESA in missione per l’Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, di mostrarci come questi "lipidi buoni" siano presenti nel cibo spaziale che lei e gli altri astroanuti hanno a disposizione mentre sono in orbita.

From: European Space Agency, ESA
Views: 144

34 ratings
Time: 01:47 More in Science & Technology

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Herschel and Planck find missing clue to galaxy cluster formation

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Herschel and Planck find missing clue to galaxy cluster formation
31-03-2015 02:00 PM CEST

Proto-cluster_candidates_small.jpg

By combining observations of the distant Universe made with ESA’s Herschel and Planck space observatories, cosmologists have discovered what could be the precursors of the vast clusters of galaxies that we see today.

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News Release: EPA Seeks Input for Potential Rule Banning or Restricting the Use of N -Methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and Methylene Chloride for Use in Paint and Coating Removal

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CONTACTS:
Cathy Milbourn(News Media only)
milbourn.cathy@epa.gov
(202) 564-7849
(202)-564-4355
Sheila Canavan (Non-Media Inquiries)
canavan.sheila@epa.gov
202-564-1978

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 30, 2015

EPA Seeks Input for Potential Rule Banning or Restricting the Use of N-Methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and Methylene Chloride for Use in Paint and Coating Removal

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking nominations from individuals who represent small businesses, small governments, and small not-for-profit organizations to provide input to a federal panel that will explore risk reduction in the use of NMP and methylene chloride for paint or coating removal.

This panel will focus on the agency’s development of a proposed rule to reduce the risk of NMP and methylene chloride in paint and coating removal as appropriate to reduce risks posed for their occupational or consumer use.

The Regulatory Flexibility Act requires agencies to establish a Small Business Advocacy Review (SBAR) Panel for rules that may have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. The SBAR panel will include federal representatives from the Small Business Administration (SBA), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and EPA.

Small Entity Representatives (SERs) will be selected by the SBAR Panel to provide comments on behalf of their company, community, or organization and advise the panel on the potential impacts of the proposed rule on small entities. EPA is seeking self-nominations directly from the small entities that may be subject to the rule requirements. Other representatives, such as trade associations that exclusively or primarily represent potentially regulated small entities, may also serve as SERs.

SERs provide advice and recommendations to the panel. The SERs participate in consultations with the SBAR Panel via telephone, webinar, or in person in one or two meetings and are given an opportunity to submit written comments to the Panel. Self-nominations may be submitted through the link below and must be received by April 10, 2015.

Nominate yourself as a Small Entity Representative: http://www.epa.gov/rfa/tsca-6a-paint-remover.html

More about the Small Business Advocacy Review process: http://www.epa.gov/sbrefa/faq.htm

R074

European Space Agency Flickr Update

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Comet 67P on 22 March 2015 – NavCam
30-03-2015 05:07 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Comet 67P on 22 March 2015 – NavCam

This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image was taken from a distance of 77.8 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 22 March 2015. The image has a resolution of 6.6 m/pixel and measures 6 x 6 km. The image is cropped, and processed to bring out the details of the comet’s activity.

More information and the original image via the blog: CometWatch 22 March.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) licence. The user is allowed to reproduce, distribute, adapt, translate and publicly perform this publication, without explicit permission, provided that the content is accompanied by an acknowledgement that the source is credited as ‘ESA – European Space Agency’, a direct link to the licence text is provided and that it is clearly indicated if changes were made to the original content. Adaptation/translation/derivatives must be distributed under the same licence terms as this publication. The user must not give any suggestion that ESA necessarily endorses the modifications that you have made. No warranties are given. The licence may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material. Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from ESA. To view a copy of this licence, please visit creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

The tumultuous heart of the Large Magellanic Cloud
30-03-2015 04:39 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

The tumultuous heart of the Large Magellanic Cloud

A scene of jagged fiery peaks, turbulent magma-like clouds and fiercely hot bursts of bright light. Although this may be reminiscent of a raging fire or the heart of a volcano, it actually shows a cold cosmic clump of gas, dust and stars.

The subject of this image, from ESA’s Herschel Space Observatory and NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, is the irregularly shaped Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the nearest galaxies to our own.

The dark, orange-tinted patches throughout the galaxy are plumes of murky dust. The hints of deep red and green mark areas of particularly cool dust, with white and blue tones highlighting hot regions of furious star formation. These pale pockets of gas are heated by the very stars they are creating, which push hot winds out into their surroundings.

To make this scene even more uninviting, the LMC is also home to a giant cosmic spider – the Tarantula Nebula. This hot cloud of gas and dust is easily visible as the brightest region in this image, located towards the lower left of the frame. This nebula is very well studied, for example by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which last year produced a stunning infrared mosaic showing the celestial creepy-crawly in great detail.

This is one of the reasons astronomers like to explore the LMC; it is close enough to us that we can pick out individual nebulas – including the Tarantula – and study how stars form, evolve and die in other galaxies. The LMC is populated by a mix of old and young stars, many of which are lined up along the galaxy’s central ‘bar’, which slants from the bottom left to the top right of this image.

ESA’s Herschel and NASA’s Spitzer are both space telescopes that explore the Universe in infrared light. The LMC looks quite different – and much more serene – in visible light, instead resembling a scattering of pale stars with occasional plumes of pink and purple.

The data making up this image are from Herschel’s Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS), and Spitzer’s Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS).

This image was previously published by NASA/JPL.

Credit: ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI

A cosmological measuring tape
30-03-2015 11:53 AM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

A cosmological measuring tape

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the spiral galaxy NGC 3021 which lies about 100 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo Minor (The Little Lion).

Among many other types of stars, this galaxy contains Cepheid variable stars, which can be used work out the distance to the galaxy. These stars pulsate at a rate that is closely related to their intrinsic brightness, so measurements of their rate of pulsation and their observed brightness give astronomers enough information to calculate the distance to the galaxy itself.

Cepheids are also used to calibrate an even brighter distance marker, that can be used over greater distances: Type Ia supernovae. One of these bright exploding stars was observed in NGC 3021, back in 1995.

In addition, the supernova in NGC 3021 was also used to refine the measurement of what is known as the Hubble constant. The value of this constant defines how fast the Universe is expanding and the more accurately we know it the more we can understand about the evolution of the Universe in the past as well as in the future. So, there is much more to this galaxy than just a pretty spiral.

Credit: ESA/NASA

Comet 67P on 19 October 2014 – NAVCAM
30-03-2015 10:46 AM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Comet 67P on 19 October 2014 - NAVCAM

This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image was taken from a distance of 10 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 19 October 2014. The image is lightly processed. It has a resolution of 86 cm/pixel and measures 876 m across.

The original, unprocessed image and more information is available via the blogt CometWatch: Around Anubis and Atum.

Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) licence. The user is allowed to reproduce, distribute, adapt, translate and publicly perform this publication, without explicit permission, provided that the content is accompanied by an acknowledgement that the source is credited as ‘ESA – European Space Agency’, a direct link to the licence text is provided and that it is clearly indicated if changes were made to the original content. Adaptation/translation/derivatives must be distributed under the same licence terms as this publication. The user must not give any suggestion that ESA necessarily endorses the modifications that you have made. No warranties are given. The licence may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material. Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from ESA. To view a copy of this licence, please visit creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Comet 67P on 21 October 2014 – NAVCAM
30-03-2015 10:46 AM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Comet 67P on 21 October 2014 - NAVCAM

This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image was taken from a distance of 10.1 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 21 October 2014. The image is lightly processed. It has a resolution of 86 cm/pixel and measures 883 m across.

The original, unprocessed image and more information is available via the blog CometWatch: Around Anubis and Atum.

Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) licence. The user is allowed to reproduce, distribute, adapt, translate and publicly perform this publication, without explicit permission, provided that the content is accompanied by an acknowledgement that the source is credited as ‘ESA – European Space Agency’, a direct link to the licence text is provided and that it is clearly indicated if changes were made to the original content. Adaptation/translation/derivatives must be distributed under the same licence terms as this publication. The user must not give any suggestion that ESA necessarily endorses the modifications that you have made. No warranties are given. The licence may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material. Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from ESA. To view a copy of this licence, please visit creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Comet 67P on 24 October 2014 – NAVCAM
30-03-2015 10:46 AM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Comet 67P on 24 October 2014 - NAVCAM

This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image was taken from a distance of 9.8 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 24 October 2014. The image has a resolution of 66 cm/pixel and measures 679 m across. The image is processed to reveal more of the dimly illuminated parts of the comet surface.

The original, unprocessed image and more information is available via the blog: CometWatch: Around Anubis and Atum.

Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) licence. The user is allowed to reproduce, distribute, adapt, translate and publicly perform this publication, without explicit permission, provided that the content is accompanied by an acknowledgement that the source is credited as ‘ESA – European Space Agency’, a direct link to the licence text is provided and that it is clearly indicated if changes were made to the original content. Adaptation/translation/derivatives must be distributed under the same licence terms as this publication. The user must not give any suggestion that ESA necessarily endorses the modifications that you have made. No warranties are given. The licence may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material. Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from ESA. To view a copy of this licence, please visit creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Comet 67P on 21 March 2015 – NAVCAM
30-03-2015 10:46 AM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Comet 67P on 21 March 2015 – NAVCAM

This single frame Rosetta navigation camera image was taken from a distance of 82.6 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 21 March 2015. The image has a resolution of 7 m/pixel and measures 6.2 x 6.2 km. The image is cropped and processed to bring out the details of the comet’s activity.

The original, unprocessed image and more information is available via the blog CometWatch: Around Anubis and Atum.

Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO (CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO) licence. The user is allowed to reproduce, distribute, adapt, translate and publicly perform this publication, without explicit permission, provided that the content is accompanied by an acknowledgement that the source is credited as ‘ESA – European Space Agency’, a direct link to the licence text is provided and that it is clearly indicated if changes were made to the original content. Adaptation/translation/derivatives must be distributed under the same licence terms as this publication. The user must not give any suggestion that ESA necessarily endorses the modifications that you have made. No warranties are given. The licence may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material. Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from ESA. To view a copy of this licence, please visit creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

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News Release: EPA Seeks Input for Potential Rule Banning or Restricting the Use of Trichloroethylen e (TCE) as a Commercial Degreaser, Spotting Agent in Dry Cleaning, and in Certain Consumer Products

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CONTACTS:
Cathy Milbourn(News Media only)
milbourn.cathy@epa.gov
(202) 564-7849
(202)-564-4355
Sheila Canavan (Non-Media Inquiries)
canavan.sheila@epa.gov
202-564-1978

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 30, 2015

EPA Seeks Input for Potential Rule Banning or Restricting the Use of Trichloroethylene (TCE) as a Commercial Degreaser, Spotting Agent in Dry Cleaning, and in Certain Consumer Products

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking nominations from individuals who represent small businesses, small governments, and small not-for-profit organizations to provide input to a federal panel that will explore risk reduction in the use of Trichloroethylene (TCE).

This panel will focus on the agency’s development of a proposed rule to reduce the risks resulting from the use of TCE as a commercial degreaser, as a spotting agent in dry cleaning, and in certain consumer products as appropriate to reduce risks posed from its commercial and consumer use.

The Regulatory Flexibility Act requires agencies to establish a Small Business Advocacy Review (SBAR) Panel for rules that may have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. The SBAR panel will include federal representatives from the Small Business Administration (SBA), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and EPA.

Small Entity Representatives (SERs) will be selected by the SBAR Panel to provide comments on behalf of their company, community or organization and advise the panel about the potential impacts of the proposed rule on small entities. EPA is seeking self-nominations directly from the small entities that may be subject to the rule requirements. Other representatives, such as trade associations that exclusively or primarily represent potentially regulated small entities, may also serve as SERs.

SERs provide advice and recommendations to the panel. The SERs participate in consultations with the SBAR Panel via telephone, webinar, or in person in one or two meetings and are given an opportunity to submit written comments to the Panel. Self-nominations may be submitted through the link below and must be received by April 10, 2015.

Nominate yourself as a Small Entity Representatives: http://www.epa.gov/rfa/tsca-6a-tce.html

More about the Small Business Advocacy Review process: http://www.epa.gov/sbrefa/faq.htm

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FracFocus Report: Helping us Paint a Fuller Picture

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You are subscribed to It All Starts With Science Blog for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Here’s the latest blog post.

FracFocus Report: Helping us Paint a Fuller Picture
03/30/2015 10:08 AM EDT

The following is an excerpt of a blog posted on EPA Connect, the Official Blog of EPA Leadership. By Tom Burke Only a few years ago, very little was known about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. Congress asked us to embark on a major effort to advance the state-of-the-science to accurately […]