European Space Agency Flickr Update

Standard

Sentinel-1B’s first image
28-04-2016 06:22 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Sentinel-1B’s first image

Sentinel-1B’s first data strip stretches 600 km from 80°N degrees through the Barents Sea. The image, which shows the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago on the left, was captured on 28 April 2016 at 05:37 GMT (07:37 CEST) – just two hours after the satellite’s radar was switched on. Sentinel-1B lifted off on a Soyuz rocket from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana on 25 April at 21:02 GMT (23:02 CEST). It joins its twin, Sentinel-1A, to provide more ‘radar vision’ for Europe’s environmental Copernicus programme.

Read article: Sentinel-1B delivers

Credit: Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data [2016], processed by ESA

Makemake and its moon (annotated)
28-04-2016 03:01 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Makemake and its moon (annotated)

This Hubble Space Telescope image reveals the first moon ever discovered around the dwarf planet Makemake. The tiny moon, located just above Makemake in this image, is barely visible because it is almost lost in the glare of the very bright dwarf planet.

Read more here.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and A. Parker and M. Buie (Southwest Research Institute)

Station 360: Tranquility (Node 3)
28-04-2016 01:56 PM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Station 360: Tranquility (Node 3)

Explore the International Space Station’s Tranquility module from all angles on your mobile phone or headset

Node-3 Tranquillity provides life-support for the International Space Station. Part of Tranquility is ESA’s Cupola observation module, a seven-window dome-shaped structure from where the Space Station’s robotic arm, Canadarm 2, is operated as it offers a panoramic view of space and Earth. Launched on Space Shuttle flight STS-130 in February 2010, Node-3 was attached to the port side of Node-1 Unity. Read more on ESA’s Node-3 minisite

Explore Tranquility (Node 3) in Flickr,

format with your mobile phone and virtual-reality headset, or take the full tour including all Space Station modules with videos and extra information below. This is the final Space Station module in 360°.

Full tour:
www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Internationa…

T6 ion thruster firing
28-04-2016 08:59 AM CEST

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

T6 ion thruster firing

The eerie blue exhaust trail of an ion thruster during a test firing. A quartet of these highly efficient T6 thrusters is being installed on ESA’s BepiColombo spacecraft to Mercury at ESA’s ESTEC Test Centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

The Mercury Transfer Module will carry Europe’s Mercury Planetary Orbiter and Japan’s Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter together to Sun’s innermost planet over the course of 6.5 years.

“BepiColombo would not be possible in its current form without these T6 thrusters,” explains ESA propulsion engineer Neil Wallace.

“Standard chemical thrusters face a fundamental upper limit on performance, set by the amount of energy in the chemical reaction that heats the ejected propellant producing the thrust.

“Ion thrusters can reach much higher exhaust speeds, typically an order of magnitude greater, because the propellant is first ionised and then accelerated using electrical energy generated by the solar panels. The higher velocity means less propellant is required.

“The down side is that the thrust levels are much lower and therefore the spacecraft acceleration is also low – meaning the thrusters have to be operating for long periods.

“However, in space there is nothing to slow us down, so over prolonged periods of thrusting the craft’s velocity is increased dramatically. Assuming the same mass of propellant, the T6 thrusters can accelerate BepiColombo to a speed 15 times greater than a conventional chemical thruster.”

The 22 cm-diameter T6 was designed for ESA by QinetiQ in the UK, whose expertise in electric propulsion stretches back to the 1960s.

It is an scaled-up version of the 10 cm T5 gridded ion thruster, which played a crucial role in ESA’s GOCE gravity-mapping mission by continuously compensating for vestigial atmospheric drag along its extremely-low orbit.

Credit: NASA/JPL

You are subscribed to Flickr for European Space Agency.

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.

WHADDAYA THINK !!!

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Google+ Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google+-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s