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Kamchatka Russia
10-03-2017 01:35 PM CET

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Kamchatka Russia

The Sentinel-3A satellite takes us over the Sea of Okhotsk in the Russian Far East on 15 February, where clouds blend with the ice and snow beneath from our bird’s-eye view.

One of the fascinating features is the pattern of floating sea ice, appearing light blue. Along the left we can see cracks in the ice covering the water. In the middle/right, small pieces of fragmented ice driven by wind and currents create the swirls of blue along the coast of the Kamchatka Peninsula.

Located in the Russian Far East, this peninsula has a landscape covered with volcanoes due to its location along the highly active Pacific ‘Ring of Fire’. There are about 160 volcanoes on the peninsula, 29 of which are still active.

We can see part of the central mountain range running down the spine of the peninsula, while the eastern range is mostly covered by clouds. Between them lies the central valley, appearing somewhat brown from the lack of snow cover.

It is no surprise that the area is often referred to as the ‘land of fire and ice’.

Owing to minimal development, the peninsula is known for its abundance of large brown bears. Other common animals include foxes, wolves, reindeer and wolverines.

Sentinel-3 is a two-satellite mission for Europe’s Copernicus programme. While Sentinel-3A has been in orbit since February 2016, the second is set for launch later this year.

This image is featured on the Earth from Space video programme.

Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA

SMART-1 views a cluster of the Moon’s craters
10-03-2017 11:26 AM CET

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

SMART-1 views a cluster of the Moon’s craters

This image shows a crater-filled region in the northeastern part of the Moon. Several features are visible here, including, to the left of the frame, the small Keldysh crater peeking into view. Below and to the right of Keldysh is the small depression of Hercules F, which sits to the left of the faint and eroded rim of Atlas E. The largest and most prominent feature, visible towards the top right of the frame, is Atlas crater.

SMART-1 was an ESA mission and the first European spacecraft to travel to and orbit around the Moon, launched on 27 September 2003. The mission ended on 3 September 2006 by a controlled lunar impact.

This image is part of a set of more than 100 that have just been re-released under a Creative Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO licence as part of ESA’s Open Access initiative. Read more at open.esa.int/the-moon-by-smart-1/

Credit: ESA/SMART-1/AMIE camera team/Space Exploration Institute, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Mayer and Bond craters seen by SMART-1
10-03-2017 11:26 AM CET

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Mayer and Bond craters seen by SMART-1

This composite image was obtained by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA’s SMART-1 spacecraft.

Crater Mayer (63.2° N, 17.3° E), a complex impact structure of 38 kilometres in diameter, is visible on the lower right of the image. On the left, it is possible to see crater Bond (5.3° N, 4.5° E), whose outer rim has been extensively eroded. Today it looks like an irregular walled plain of about 156 kilometres in diameter.

The ’snapshot‘ images were obtained on 5 and 6 February 2006, from altitudes ranging between 2685 km (bottom of the composite) and 2709 km (top). Each individual snapshot, taken with the AMIE clear filter, is about 135 square kilometres. The whole composite covers an area of approximately 270 square kilometres.

SMART-1 was an ESA mission and the first European spacecraft to travel to and orbit around the Moon, launched on 27 September 2003. The mission ended on 3 September 2006 by a controlled lunar impact.

This image is part of a set of more than 100 that have just been re-released under a Creative Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO licence as part of ESA’s Open Access initiative. Read more at open.esa.int/the-moon-by-smart-1/

Credit: ESA/Space Exploration Institute, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Mare Humorum by SMART-1
10-03-2017 11:26 AM CET

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Mare Humorum by SMART-1

A mosaic of pictures taken by SMART-1’s AMIE camera. It shows a part of the Humorum basin showing graben features or elongated, trench-like erosional features. The size of individual images is 50 km. The original publication date is 22 August 2007.

SMART-1 was an ESA mission and the first European spacecraft to travel to and orbit around the Moon, launched on 27 September 2003. The mission ended on 3 September 2006 by a controlled lunar impact.

This image is part of a set of more than 100 that have just been re-released under a Creative Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO licence as part of ESA’s Open Access initiative. Read more at open.esa.int/the-moon-by-smart-1/

Credit: ESA/Space Exploration Institute), CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Annotated lunar south pole mosaic
10-03-2017 11:26 AM CET

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Annotated lunar south pole mosaic

This is a mosaic of images taken by SMART-1’s AMIE camera. It shows a part of the Humorum basin showing graben features or elongated, trench-like erosional features. The size of individual images is 50 km.

SMART-1 was an ESA mission and the first European spacecraft to travel to and orbit around the Moon, launched on 27 September 2003. The mission ended on 3 September 2006 by a controlled lunar impact.

This image is part of a set of more than 100 that have just been re-released under a Creative Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO licence as part of ESA’s Open Access initiative. Read more at open.esa.int/the-moon-by-smart-1/

Credit: ESA/SMART-1/AMIE camera team/Space Exploration Institute, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Lunar horizon seen by SMART-1 a few hours before impact
10-03-2017 11:26 AM CET

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Lunar horizon seen by SMART-1 a few hours before impact

This oblique view of the lunar surface was taken on 2 September 2006 by the AMIE camera on board SMART-1 during the last few orbits prior to Moon impact, and shows the Moon’s horizon.

This view was captured during the imaging session which took place bewteen 15:19 and 17:34 CEST (17:19 – 19:34 UT).

SMART-1 was an ESA mission and the first European spacecraft to travel to and orbit around the Moon, launched on 27 September 2003. The mission ended on 3 September 2006 by a controlled lunar impact.

This image is part of a set of more than 100 that have just been re-released under a Creative Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO licence as part of ESA’s Open Access initiative. Read more at open.esa.int/the-moon-by-smart-1/

Credit: ESA/Space-X (Space Exploration Institute), CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Craters on the edge
10-03-2017 11:26 AM CET

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Craters on the edge

This mosaic covers about 700 km by 220 km and was taken by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment on SMART-1. It shows a trio of craters very near to the Moon’s north pole, on the edge of the Luna Incognita. From right to left, these craters are named Plaskett, Rozhdestvenskiy and Hermite.

SMART-1 was an ESA mission and the first European spacecraft to travel to and orbit around the Moon, launched on 27 September 2003. The mission ended on 3 September 2006 by a controlled lunar impact.

This image is part of a set of more than 100 that have just been re-released under a Creative Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO licence as part of ESA’s Open Access initiative. Read more at open.esa.int/the-moon-by-smart-1/

Credit: ESA/SMART-1/AMIE camera team/Space Exploration Institute, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Crater De Gasparis as seen by SMART-1
10-03-2017 11:26 AM CET

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

Crater De Gasparis as seen by SMART-1

The AMIE camera obtained this image on 14 January 2006 from a distance of about 1090 kilometres with a ground resolution of approximately 100 metres per pixel. It is located close to the Mare Humorum, at longitude 51.2° West and latitude 26.0° South, and has a diameter of about 30 kilometres.

SMART-1 was an ESA mission and the first European spacecraft to travel to and orbit around the Moon, launched on 27 September 2003. The mission ended on 3 September 2006 by a controlled lunar impact.

This image is part of a set of more than 100 that have just been re-released under a Creative Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO licence as part of ESA’s Open Access initiative. Read more at open.esa.int/the-moon-by-smart-1/

Credit: ESA/Space-X (Space Exploration Institute), CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

A Lunar Pox
10-03-2017 11:26 AM CET

europeanspaceagency posted a photo:

A Lunar Pox

The pockmarked landscape captured in this image from ESA’s SMART-1 mission is the surface of our Moon. Some of the many craters scattered across the lunar surface are clearly visible, records of the many impacts that have plagued it.

At the very centre of this image is the lunar north pole, captured in detail during ESA’s mission. The image shows the characteristic craters of the Moon, present in all shapes and sizes. The largest in view is Rozhdestvenskiy, sandwiched between Hermite to the northeast and Plaskett to the southwest.

This view was captured during the imaging session which took place bewteen 15:19 and 17:34 CEST (17:19 – 19:34 UT).

SMART-1 was an ESA mission and the first European spacecraft to travel to and orbit around the Moon, launched on 27 September 2003. The mission ended on 3 September 2006 by a controlled lunar impact.

This image is part of a set of more than 100 that have just been re-released under a Creative Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO licence as part of ESA’s Open Access initiative. Read more at open.esa.int/the-moon-by-smart-1/

Credit: ESA/ Space Exploration Institute, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

Acknowledgments: J. Manuel Fonseca, M. Costa & A. Mora (UNINOVA); B. Grieger & M. Almeida (ESA),

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